Question: How Do You Spell Targetted UK?

Is it focussing or focusing?

Usage notes The Oxford English Dictionary describes the spelling focussed as irregular.

The spelling focussed is a widely seen UK spelling but focused, (focuses, focusing) is more common in prestige publications..

Is S or Z British?

In British English, either version is fine. Yes, generations of readers and writers have grown up being used to reading realise with an s. But as either version is accepted there, and in America only one is, statistically the z wins.

What words do British spell differently?

Most words ending in an unstressed -our in British English (e.g., colour, flavour, behaviour, harbour, honour, humour, labour, neighbour, rumour, splendour) end in -or in American English (color, flavor, behavior, harbor, honor, humor, labor, neighbor, rumor, splendor).

Is it targeted or targeted?

It becomes just ‘targeting/targeted’, because there is usually no doubling when the preceding vowel is unstressed. Some words change their spelling to cope (they add a letter ‘k’).

What is a target or goal?

Target – an indicator established to determine how successfully you are achieving an objective. Goal – an indicator established to determine whether you have achieved your objective.

What is the opposite word of target?

Antonyms & Near Antonyms for target. applaud, approve, commend, endorse.

How do you spell recognize in the UK?

Recognise is an alternate spelling of the same verb. It means the same thing and can be used in all the same contexts. Recognise is more common in British English than it is in American English. That said, even the British prefer recognize—and have for some time.

What is a synonym for targeted?

Synonyms & Near Synonyms for targeted. baited, barracked.

Why do Americans spell color?

As with a large percentage of word differences, the American spelling of color was the direct decision of one very important man: Noah Webster. Famously, Webster introduced the relatively young nation of the United States to the dictionary, an influential book that helped to demarcate American English from Dr.

What does turgid mean?

adjective. swollen; distended; tumid. inflated, overblown, or pompous; bombastic: turgid language.

What is the difference between American and British spelling?

The main difference is that British English keeps the spelling of words it has absorbed from other languages, mainly French and German. Whilst American English spellings are based mostly on how the word sounds when it is spoken.

What’s another word for victim?

In this page you can discover 46 synonyms, antonyms, idiomatic expressions, and related words for victim, like: prey, wretch, martyr, dupe, pigeon, hunted, gudgeon, immolation, sufferer, quarry; game and offering.

What is another word for Will?

Will Synonyms – WordHippo Thesaurus….What is another word for will?desirewishmindpreferenceinclinationintentionpleasuredispositionfancyintent56 more rows

What is the past tense of target?

past tense of target is targeted or targetted.

What does the word targeted mean?

targeted; targeting; targets. Definition of target (Entry 2 of 2) transitive verb. 1 : to make a target of targeted her for promotion especially : to set as a goal. 2 : to direct or use toward a target.

What is the correct way to spell the past tense of cancel?

Canceled or cancelled is the past tense of the verb to cancel. Both spellings are correct; Americans favor canceled (one L), while cancelled (two Ls) is preferred in British English and other dialects. However, there is only one correct spelling of the word cancellation, no matter where you are.

Is it GREY or gray?

Grey and gray are two different spellings of the same word. Gray is more common in the U.S., while grey is more common in other English-speaking countries. In proper names—like Earl Grey tea and the unit Gray, among others—the spelling stays the same, and they need to be memorized.

Is cancellable a word?

What does cancellable mean? The word cancellable (which is also but less commonly spelled cancelable) describes something, such as a contract or policy, that can be canceled—that is, that can be made no longer valid or effective.