Question: How Do You Teach Possessives?

What are the 12 possessive pronouns?

Possessive pronouns include my, mine, our, ours, its, his, her, hers, their, theirs, your and yours..

Where do we use apostrophes examples?

When using a singular noun, the apostrophe is used before the s. For example: “The squirrel’s nuts were stashed in a hollow tree.” When using a plural noun, the apostrophe goes after the s. For example: “The squirrels’ nuts were hidden in several hollow trees throughout the forest.”

Is someone’s possessive?

The possessive adjective for someone.

What are personal and possessive pronouns?

The personal pronouns mine, yours, hers, his, ours, and theirs are known as possessive pronouns: they refer to something owned by the speaker or by someone or something previously mentioned.

How do you teach possession in English?

For nouns with an irregular plural form like children, add an apostrophe then “s”. So, if you are talking about two women, then you would show possession by simply adding an apostrophe and the letter “s”.

How do you teach possessive apostrophes?

Teach the possessive apostrophe rule: “If a noun is plural and ends in s, then add an apostrophe to the end; otherwise, add apostrophe then an s.” This sounds a bit awkward at first, but it always works. Try the rule out with students.

What are the 7 possessive pronouns?

The possessive pronouns are my, our, your, his, her, its, and their. There’s also an “independent” form of each of these pronouns: mine, ours, yours, his, hers, its, and theirs.

What are the 5 examples of apostrophe?

Apostrophe ExamplesTwinkle, twinkle, little star, how I wonder what you are. ( … O holy night! … Then come, sweet death, and rid me of this grief. ( … O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth. ( … Roll on, thou deep and dark blue Ocean – roll! ( … Welcome, O life!More items…•

What does a possessive apostrophe look like?

The possessive form is used with nouns referring to people, groups of people, countries, and animals. It shows a relationship of belonging between one thing and another. To form the possessive, add apostrophe + s to the noun. If the noun is plural, or already ends in s, just add an apostrophe after the s.

Which are possessive pronouns?

Possessive pronouns describe what things belong to which people, like “her shoe” or “the book is mine.” Possessive pronouns can be adjectives, like “his bicycle,” or they can stand in for nouns, like “the seats are theirs.” Neither of these forms should have apostrophes to show possession — so it’s ours (not our’s) …

How do you explain possessive pronouns to children?

Possessive pronouns are pronouns that show ownership. They include: my, mine, your, yours, his, her, hers, our, ours, their, and theirs. Unlike other possessives, you do not use an apostrophe.

How do you teach possessive pronouns fun?

A great way to work on possessive pronouns is to create a game using your students’ own personal items. Start by having three students collect two personal items from either their desk or locker. Mix all the items up without the other students seeing them and set them in front of the students.

How do you teach possessive adjectives to children?

Students who come to this grammar point for the first time often already know “What’s your name?” “My name is…”, so a good way into possessive adjectives can be extending that to “What’s my/ his/ her/ its name?” and “What are our/ their names?” The most obvious and easiest way of drilling this is by students testing …