Question: What Is Main Clause And Examples?

What is a main clause and subordinate clause examples?

An example of a main clause would be ‘Tim likes to draw’.

A subordinate clause would be, ‘Tim like to draw, even when he’s tired’.

Another example of a main clause would be ‘I like cars’ – a simple sentence made up of just a main clause..

What is an example of a subordinate clause?

A subordinate clause has a subject and a verb, but it cannot stand alone as a complete sentence. Let’s look at some examples; If you win the award (you=subject; win=verb) … When she was sick (she=subject; was=verb)

What are some examples of a subordinate clause?

Examples of Subordinate Clauses:Because I said so (I=subject; said=verb)When I was five (I=subject; was=verb)Since it will rain today (it=subject; will rain=verb)Who is my best friend (not written as a question-who=subject; is=verb)If you pass the test (you=subject; pass=verb)

What is a clause in grammar?

Definition: A clause is a group of words that has both a subject and a predicate. Every complete sentence is made up of at least one clause.

What is clause and examples?

A clause is a group of words that contains a verb (and usually other components too). A clause may form part of a sentence or it may be a complete sentence in itself. For example: He was eating a bacon sandwich. [clause]

How do you identify a main clause and a subordinate clause?

Main clauses have a subject and verb and can stand on their own. Subordinate clauses begin with a conjunction and therefore cannot stand on their own. They leave the reader thinking “yes…and then?”

What are the 3 types of clauses?

Clauses come in four types: main (or independent), subordinate (or dependent), adjective (or relative), and noun. Every clause has at least one subject and one verb.

What are the 10 subordinating conjunctions?

The most common subordinating conjunctions in the English language include: than, rather than, whether, as much as, whereas, that, whatever, which, whichever, after, as soon as, as long as, before, by the time, now that, once, since, till, until, when, whenever, while, though, although, even though, who, whoever, whom, …

What is the difference between a clause and a sentence?

clause: A clause is a combination of a predicate (full verb or nonverbal predicate) and its arguments, plus modifiers. sentence: A sentence is a maximal clause, i.e. a clause that is not part of another clause. complex clause (= “complex sentence”): A complex clause is a clause that contains at least one other clause.

What are the 3 subordinate clauses?

There are three types of subordinate clauses: adjective, adverb, and noun. When a subordinate clause modifies a noun or pronoun it is called an adjective clause. An adjective clause is going to describe a noun in the sentence. Often, an adjective clause is introduced by a relative pronoun.

What type of sentence contains a main clause?

A main clause is a clause that contains a subject and an object. Main clauses make sense on their own. ‘I like bananas. ‘ is a simple sentence which is made up of a main clause.

What is subordinate clause in English grammar?

A subordinate clause is a clause that cannot stand alone as a complete sentence; it merely complements a sentence’s main clause, thereby adding to the whole unit of meaning. Because a subordinate clause is dependent upon a main clause to be meaningful, it is also referred to as a dependent clause.

What is a clause simple definition?

1 : a group of words containing a subject and predicate and functioning as a member of a complex (see complex entry 2 sense 1b(2)) or compound (see compound entry 2 sense 3b) sentence The sentence “When it rained they went inside” consists of two clauses: “when it rained” and “they went inside.”

How do you use clause in a sentence?

Clause sentence examplesOne important variation, however, was a clause in the bill of rights providing for the abolition of slavery, Vermont being the first state in America to take such action. … “Definitely not Santa Clause,” she said with a laugh.More items…