Question: What Words Can Start A Dependent Clause?

What is the example of dependent clause?

(Because he injured his foot is a dependent clause.

It contains the subject he and the verb injured.

The clause does not express a complete thought and cannot stand on its own as a sentence.).

What are dependent and independent clauses examples?

, independent clause. Example: I was tired from working all day; therefore, I decided to go to bed early. When the dependent clause begins with a subordinating conjunction (connecting word) and precedes the independent clause, separate the clauses with a comma. dependent clause, independent clause.

How do you join independent and dependent clauses?

To combine two independent clauses (complete sentences), use a semicolon or a comma and conjunction. To attach a dependent clause, use a comma if it comes before the independent clause; use no comma if it comes after the independent clause, unless it is a “contrast word” (although, though, even though, whereas).

How do you identify an independent clause?

An independent clause is a clause that can stand on its own, by itself. It does not need to be joined to any other clauses, because it contains all the information necessary to be a complete sentences. Independent clauses have three components: They have a subject – they tell the reader what the sentence is about.

How do you join independent clauses?

Two independent clauses can also be joined into one compound sentence with a semicolon alone. (Note: You can use a comma between independent clauses only if you also use a coordinating conjunction.) To learn how to form a compound sentence like this, look at these simple sentences.

Is there a comma between independent and dependent clauses?

~ Use a comma to separate the dependent clause from the independent when it follows the independent one if the dependent clause is nonessential. Keep in mind, however, that many dependent clauses will be essential and will not require a comma.

What do dependent clauses start with?

A subordinate clause—also called a dependent clause—will begin with a subordinate conjunction or a relative pronoun. Like all clauses, it will have both a subject and a verb. This combination of words will not form a complete sentence. It will instead make a reader want additional information to finish the thought.

What are the 3 types of dependent clauses?

The different types of dependent clauses include content clauses (noun clauses), relative (adjectival) clauses, and adverbial clauses.

What is a clause for kids?

A clause is a group of words consisting of a subject (often just a single noun) and a predicate (sometimes just a single verb). Example: The dog ran through the yard.

What is a dependent clause in a sentence?

A dependent clause is a group of words that contains a subject and verb but does not express a complete thought. A dependent clause cannot be a sentence.

What is an example of a clause?

A clause contains only one subject and one verb. The subject of a clause can be mentioned or hidden, but the verb must be apparent and distinguishable. Example: I graduated last year.

What is a simple sentence example?

A simple sentence has the most basic elements that make it a sentence: a subject, a verb, and a completed thought. Examples of simple sentences include the following: Joe waited for the train. The train was late.

How many dependent clauses can a sentence have?

A COMPLEX SENTENCE has one dependent clause (headed by a subordinating conjunction or a relative pronoun ) joined to an independent clause.

What is a simple sentence?

A simple sentence contains one independent clause. A compound sentence contains more than one! Put another way: a simple sentence contains a subject and a predicate, but a compound sentence contains more than one subject and more than one predicate.

How do you tell if a sentence is independent or dependent?

An independent clause is a sentence that has a subject and a verb and requires no extra information to understand. Dependent clauses, which start with subordinating conjunctions such as “while,” “that,” or “unless,” give background information but cannot stand on their own as sentences.