Quick Answer: Can I Use Whose To Refer To An Object?

Can you use Whose for a company?

It is just fine for anything at all.

You cannot use which there.

However, it does make a difference whether you use whose as a relative pronoun or as an interrogative pronoun..

What is the difference between which and whose?

Because “which” isn’t necessarily a possessive noun. “Whose” defines some sort of ownership, but “which” by itself doesn’t. Dictionary.com has several definitions for “which” and “whose”, but not until “which” adds prepositions does it become a possessive (e.g. of which, on which).

Who or whose or whom?

Whom should be used to refer to the object of a verb or preposition. When in doubt, try this simple trick: If you can replace the word with “he”’ or “’she,” use who. If you can replace it with “him” or “her,” use whom. Who should be used to refer to the subject of a sentence.

Who’s or whose birthday?

“Who’s” is a contraction of “who is” or “who has”. “Whose” is the possessive form of “who”.

Whose or who’s example?

whose is whether you need one word (whose) or two (who’s). Substitute the words who is, (and then who has) into your sentence. If either substitution works: who’s is your word. Who’s is a contraction of who is or who has.

Why do we use which?

We use which in relative clauses to refer to animals and to things: We have seen a lot of changes which are good for business. … We also use which to introduce a relative clause when it refers to a whole clause or sentence: She seemed more talkative than usual, which was because she was nervous.

Can whose be used for plural?

Answer and Explanation: The word “whose” can be used with both singular and plural nouns, and its form doesn’t change.

Whose fault or who’s fault?

First off, you need the possessive pronoun of who in front of the noun fault; that’s whose, not who’s. Who’s is the contraction of who is or who has. Second, the sentence is not in the interrogative.

What is the meaning of whose?

: that which belongs to whom —used without a following noun as a pronoun equivalent in meaning to the adjective whosetell me whose it was— William Shakespeare.

What to use instead of Whose for things?

The inanimate whose refers to the use in English of the relative pronoun whose with non-personal antecedents, as in: “That’s the car whose alarm keeps waking us up at night.” The construction is also known as the whose inanimate, non-personal whose, and neuter whose.

Can you use Whose for animals?

It is correct to use “whose” for animals and objects, and many good speakers and writers use it this way. However, some people don’t like this use and avoid it.

Who vs whom examples sentences?

The Best Way to RememberUse “who” when the subject of the sentence would normally require a subject pronoun like “he” or “she.” … Use “whom” when a sentence needs an object pronoun like “him” or “her.” For example, “This is for whom?” Again, if you rewrote that question as a statement, “this is for him” sounds correct.

What is another word for whose?

Whose Synonyms – WordHippo Thesaurus….What is another word for whose?of whichof whomwhichthatwhom1 more row

Is Whose the same as who is?

Who’s. Who’s is a contraction linking the words who is or who has, and whose is the possessive form of who. They may sound the same, but spelling them correctly can be tricky.

Which is or that is?

In a defining clause, use that. In non-defining clauses, use which. Remember, which is as disposable as a sandwich bag. If you can remove the clause without destroying the meaning of the sentence, the clause is nonessential and you can use which.

Can whose refer to a country?

To summarize, when the word “whose” is used as an interrogative pronoun, it can only refer to a person; however, when it is used as a relative pronoun, the word “whose” can indeed refer to things and objects.

How do you use the word whose?

Whose is the possessive form of the pronoun who and is defined as belonging to or associated with which person. When used in a sentence, it usually (but not always) appears before a noun. For example, Whose turn is it to move?

Who used in a sentence?

Apparently Señor Medena had two children who denied him. A friend of hers who is a florist asks if she can advertise on the site. How can he remember well his ignorance–which his growth requires–who has so often to use his knowledge? If he knew who Alex really was, he probably knew more than Alex did.