Quick Answer: Do And Does Usage?

Can anyone or can anyone?

“can anyone” is correct.

Because ‘any’ is used in interrogative and negative sentences.

And ‘some’ is used in positive sentences..

Do or does either of you?

“Does either (one) of you guys” is obviously grammatically correct. Nonetheless, “Do either …” is widely used and seems natural to a native speaker. “you guys” being plural falsely attracts the plural form of the verb, “do”.

Have got or had got?

Have got is not normally used in the simple past tense (had got); it is not considered correct to say *”Last year we had got a house in the city.” Rather, had alone is used as the simple past. Had got is normally heard as an even more colloquial version of have got.

Do or does with anyone?

‘Anybody’ is a third person singular form and takes -s in the present simple tense. That’s why the question form requires -s and ‘Does anybody’ is correct. The same would apply to ‘Does anyone’, ‘Does anything’ etc.

What kind of verb is like?

The word ”like” can also be categorized as an adverb if it is used to modify a verb, an adjective, or another adverb. Take for example, the sentence below: … In this sentence, the word modifies the adjective “750,” and is therefore considered as an adverb.

Do we have or have we got?

When we are talking about possession, relationships, illnesses and characteristics of people or things we can use either have or have got. The have got forms are more common in an informal style. Have got has the same meaning as have and both are used as present tenses.

What is a good question to ask?

Here are 8 of the best questions to ask:What is the first thing you notice about a person? … What are some challenges you think the next generation will face? … What three habits will improve your life? … For what in your life do you feel most grateful? … If you could have lunch with one person alive or dead, who would it be?More items…

What are examples of questions?

WH Question Wordsquestion wordfunctionexample sentencewhereasking in or at what place or positionWhere do they live?whichasking about choiceWhich colour do you want?whoasking what or which person or people (subject)Who opened the door?whomasking what or which person or people (object)Whom did you see?16 more rows

Could uses and examples?

We use could to show that something is possible, but not certain:They could come by car. (= Maybe they will come by car.) … It can be very cold here in winter. … That can’t be true. … It’s ten o’clock. … It could be very cold there in winter. … They know the way here. … She can speak several languages. … I can see you.More items…

Do and does sentence?

“Does” is used for singular subjects like “he,” “she,” “it,” “this,” “that,” or “John.” “Do” is used to form imperative sentences, or commands. Example: Do your homework. “Does” is never used to form imperative sentences.

Do and does Questions exercise?

Questions with do or does – Exercise 1Does. Peter live with his father?Does. you learn Spanish?Does. Andrew and Martin ride their bikes to school?Does. they play in the garden?Does. Sandy’s hamster live in a cage?Does. the cats sit on the wall?Does. we work in front of the computer?Does. you play the drums?More items…

Has anyone of you or have anyone of you?

The correct form should be ‘have any of you’ as you is in plural form. ‘Any one of you’ is different. Any one, meaning ‘any single (person or thing),’ is written as two words to emphasize singularity: any one of us could do the job; not more than ten new members are chosen in any one year.

Where we use have had?

We use have had in the present perfect when the main verb is also “have”: I’m not feeling well. I have had a headache all day. She has had three children in the past five years.

Where do we use does in a sentence?

When the subject is he, she or it, we add DOES at the beginning to make the affirmative sentence a question. Notice that the letter S at the end of the verb in the affirmative sentence (because it is in third person) disappears in the question.

Has got vs gotten?

In American English, “got” and “gotten” can both be past participles of the verb “get.” The correct term depends on what you are describing: Use got when referring to a state of owning or possessing something. Use gotten when referring to a process of “getting” something.