Quick Answer: How Do You Make Charles Possessive?

Is it Chris’s or Chris?

Which is correct, Chris’s chair or Chris’ chair.

James’s car or James’ car.

Actually, both ways are correct.

If a proper name ends with an s, you can add just the apostrophe or an apostrophe and an s..

Is S’s correct?

Yes, even if the name ends in “s,” it’s still correct to add another “‘s” to create the possessive form. It is also acceptable to add only an apostrophe to the end of singular nouns that end in “s” to make them possessive. In this case, you can show possession for Ross either way: Ross’

Is it Alexis’s or Alexis?

Alexis’s or simply Alexis’. Both are correct.

When to use it’s or its?

It’s is a contraction of “it is” or “it has.” Its is a possessive determiner we use to say that something belongs to or refers to something. It’s and its are among the most commonly confused words.

Is it Williams’s or Williams?

Plural Is Not the Same As Possessive First, the apostrophe makes the names possessive, and when we send greetings, they are from us, not from something we own. The names Smith and Williams would need to be in the possessive case only if the greeting were from Jane Smith’s hamster or John Williams’s goldfish.

Is it the Smiths or the Smith’s?

The Smiths is plural for “Smith” and means there is more than one person named Smith and the invitation is from them all. When in doubt, we like to use “The Smith Family”. The Smith’s (with an apostrophe before the s) is the possessive of “Smith” and indicates one person ownership.

How do you make Charles plural?

Charles’ and Charles’s are both correct. Charleses is the plural form, like Joneses.

How do you make a name that ends in s possessive?

The possessive of a plural noun is formed by adding only an apostrophe when the noun ends in s, and by adding both an apostrophe and s when it ends in a letter other than s.

What is the possessive form of Dennis?

Ever since 1970, if the word, although singular, ends in an “s” (like Dennis or Jesus) I have simply placed an apostrophe at the end: i.e., Dennis’—-and that is what I would recommend you do, as well, in the phrase Dennis’ car.

Do I put an apostrophe after my last name?

Adding an apostrophe makes the last name possessive, which is unnecessary in this case. Depending on the last letter of the name, simply add –s or –es. Signing a card, “Happy holidays from the Smiths!” correctly includes the entire family in the message’s sentiment.

Is it Jones’s or Jones?

The Joneses is correct because it indicates more than one member of the family. The Jones’s indicates possession, as in the Jones’s home. Simply add an s to the end of your last name to indicate the message is coming from more than one family member.

Can it’s be used as a possessive?

Its is a possessive form of the pronoun it, meaning belonging to it. It’s is a contraction of the words it is or it has.

Is there a possessive its?

Its is a possessive pronoun meaning, “belonging to it,” or a “quality of it” (Example: The carrier lost its license) or (Example: Its color is red.) And there’s absolutely, positively no such word as its’.

Where does the apostrophe go when showing ownership?

An apostrophe is a small punctuation mark ( ‘ ) placed after a noun to show that the noun owns something. The apostrophe will always be placed either before or after an s at the end of the noun owner. Always the noun owner will be followed (usually immediately) by the thing it owns.

How do you pluralize a last name?

The plurals of last names are just like the plurals of most nouns. They typically get formed by adding -s. Except, that is, if the name already ends in s or z. Then the plural is formed by adding -es.

Is it Thomas or Thomas’s?

So a safe solution is to treat singular nouns ending in S the same way you treat singulars nouns not ending in S: Form the possessive with an apostrophe and an S. Thomas’s house. The important thing to remember is that Thomas is singular.

Do you ever use S’s?

One method, common in newspapers and magazines, is to add an apostrophe plus s (‘s) to common nouns ending in s, but only a stand-alone apostrophe to proper nouns ending in s. Another widely used technique, the one we favor, is to write the word as we would speak it.

How do you make its possessive?

But its simply owns something — it’s soooo possessive. Its is the possessive form of “it.” In a nutshell: It’s is always a contraction, so if you can replace it’s with “it is” or “it has,” then keep that apostrophe on there. It’s appropriate!

What is the possessive of Davis?

According to Grammarbook.com, the nerds of the world will argue heatedly on the subject for eternity, but the most roundly accepted rule is to include the apostrophe, along with an extra “S.” (Davis’s rather than Davis’).