Quick Answer: How Do You Target Possessive Pronouns?

What are the first person possessive pronouns?

First, Second, and Third Person PronounsPersonSubjective CasePossessive Case Possessive PronounsFirst Person SingularImineSecond Person SingularyouyoursThird Person Singularhe/she/ithis/hers/itsFirst Person Pluralweours2 more rows.

What are personal and possessive pronouns?

The personal pronouns mine, yours, hers, his, ours, and theirs are known as possessive pronouns: they refer to something owned by the speaker or by someone or something previously mentioned. For example: That book is mine.

What are possessive nouns examples?

What are Possessive Nouns?Possessive nouns can be used to show ‘belonging to’ or ‘ownership’. Examples: This is Jill’s house. ( Jill owns the house) … Possessive nouns can show where someone works or studies or spends time. Examples: I went to Jack’s school. … Possessive nouns can indicate family relationships.

Who are possessive pronouns?

Whose is a pronoun used in questions to ask who owns something or has something. … That’s what the apostrophe indicates in who’s, and that’s why whose is the possessive form of the pronoun .

What is a possessive noun in a sentence?

Possessive nouns are nouns that show ownership or possession. Normally these words would be a singular or plural noun, but in the possessive form they are used as adjectives to modify another a noun or pronoun. Here the word “cat’s” is a possessive noun. … The cat owns the fur.

What are the 12 personal pronouns?

In Modern English the personal pronouns include: “I,” “you,” “he,” “she,” “it,” “we,” “they,” “them,” “us,” “him,” “her,” “his,” “hers,” “its,” “theirs,” “our,” “your.” Personal pronouns are used in statements and commands, but not in questions; interrogative pronouns (like “who,” “whom,” “what”) are used there.

What is the difference between a possessive pronoun and a possessive determiner?

Introduction. Possessive pronouns indicate possession or belonging. … Possessive determiners, also called possessive adjectives (my/your etc.), come before a noun, whereas, possessive pronouns (mine/yours etc.) replace a noun.

What is a possessive pronoun that stands alone?

The absolute, or strong, possessive pronoun stands alone, does not modify a noun, and functions as a subject. It is often referred as a possessive pronoun., though it is, in fact, an absolute pronoun. The basic absolute pronouns are: his, hers, mine, yours, theirs, its, and ours.

What is a possessive phrase?

These are noun phrases which are compounds with more than one noun, or which include other phrases, such as prepositional phrases and relative clauses, and which are then turned into possessive phrases with ‘s attached to the final word in the phrase.

Is it his and my or his and mine?

Note: The noun comes first. Bill’s and my report will be ready for printing tomorrow. The report is his and mine. (Never use an apostrophe with a possessive personal pronoun.)

What is the difference between a pronoun and a possessive pronoun?

A possessive adjective is an adjective that is used to show ownership. It comes before a noun in the sentence and lets us know to whom the noun belongs. A possessive pronoun does show ownership, but it does not come before a noun or in a noun phrase. …

Why do we use possessive pronouns?

We use possessive pronouns to refer to a specific person/people or thing/things (the “antecedent”) belonging to a person/people (and sometimes belonging to an animal/animals or thing/things). We use possessive pronouns depending on: number: singular (eg: mine) or plural (eg: ours)

How do you do possessive pronouns?

Possessive Pronouns: Used in SentencesThe kids are yours and mine.The house is theirs and its paint is flaking.The money was really theirs for the taking.We shall finally have what is rightfully ours.Their mother gets along well with yours.What’s mine is yours, my friend.The dog is mine.The cat is yours.More items…

What are the 7 possessive pronouns?

The possessive pronouns are my, our, your, his, her, its, and their. There’s also an “independent” form of each of these pronouns: mine, ours, yours, his, hers, its, and theirs.

How do you teach possessive pronouns fun?

In this fun possessives activity, students play a memory game to practice possessive pronouns. Divide the students into pairs. Give each student a picture of an object and each pair a picture to share. The students then play a memory game where they try to remember who owns what object.

What are the two types of possessive pronouns?

There are two types of possessive pronouns: The strong (or absolute) possessive pronouns are mine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, yours, and theirs. They refer back to a noun or noun phrase already used, replacing it to avoid repetition: “I said that phone was mine.”

Is someone’s possessive?

The possessive adjective for someone.

Where do we use possessive pronouns?

Possessive pronouns can be used to describe single objects or more than one. To describing something singular, you would use one of the following pronouns: “mine, yours, his, hers”. E.g. “The cat is mine.” “ This round is yours.