Quick Answer: What Is An Appositive Phrase?

What is gerund phrase example?

Gerund phrases, which always function as nouns, will be subjects, subject complements, or objects in the sentence.

Read these examples: Eating ice cream on a windy day can be a messy experience if you have long, untamed hair.

Eating ice cream on a windy day = subject of the linking verb can be..

What is apposition in Latin?

An appositive is a noun explaining or defining another noun. In Latin, an appositive will have the same case, usually the same number, and usually the same gender as the noun it explains or defines.

What are the two types of Appositives?

There are two types of appositives (nonessential and essential), and it’s important to know the difference because they are punctuated differently. Most are nonessential. (These are also called nonrestrictive.) That means that they’re not an essential part of the sentence, and sentences would be clear without them.

What do appositive phrases start with?

Sometimes, appositives and appositive phrases begin with that is, in other words, such as, and for example. Appositives may be considered essential or nonessential depending on the context.

What is the best definition of an appositive?

An appositive is a noun or noun phrase that modifies another noun next to it in the same sentence.

Can you have two Appositives in a sentence?

As long as we don’t overwhelm the reader with too much information at one time, a double or triple appositive can be an effective way of adding supplementary details to a sentence.

What does Asyndeton mean?

Asyndeton (from the Greek: ἀσύνδετον, “unconnected”, sometimes called asyndetism) is a literary scheme in which one or several conjunctions are deliberately omitted from a series of related clauses. Examples include veni, vidi, vici and its English translation “I came, I saw, I conquered”.

What is an example of an appositive phrase?

An appositive is a noun or noun phrase that renames another noun right beside it. … Look at these appositive examples, all of which rename insect: The insect, a cockroach, is crawling across the kitchen table.

What are Appositives in English?

An appositive is a noun or pronoun — often with modifiers — set beside another noun or pronoun to explain or identify it. … An appositive phrase usually follows the word it explains or identifies, but it may also precede it.

What are absolute phrases?

An absolute phrase (nominative absolute) is generally made up of a noun or pronoun with a participial phrase. It modifies the whole sentence, not a single noun, which makes it different from a participial phrase. Absolute phrases: Its branches covered in icicles, the tall oak stood in our yard.

What are infinitive phrases?

An infinitive phrase will begin with an infinitive (To + Simple Form of the Verb). It will include one or more objects and/or modifiers. … To win the approval of her mother = noun (direct object for the action verb hopes).

Which is or that is?

In a defining clause, use that. In non-defining clauses, use which. Remember, which is as disposable as a sandwich bag. If you can remove the clause without destroying the meaning of the sentence, the clause is nonessential and you can use which.

What is the appositive phrase in this sentence?

An appositive is a noun or noun phrase (appositive phrase) that gives another name to the noun right next to it. It adds descriptive words about a specific thing (the noun), which helps make a sentence more detailed; or, it adds essential information to make the sentence’s meaning clear.

What is an example of apposition?

In grammar, an apposition occurs when two words or phrases are placed beside each other in a sentence so that one describes or defines the other. An example is the phrase “my dog Woofers,” in which “my dog” is in apposition to the name “Woofers.”