What Is Correct James Or James’S?

Do you put apostrophe S in a last name?

Unless you want to make your last name possessive, there aren’t any circumstances where you would need to add an apostrophe.

The rule goes like this: If your name ends in s, x, z, ch, or sh, add -es to the end.

Of course, things get a little trickier when you want to make a last name plural and possessive..

Where does the apostrophe go when showing ownership?

An apostrophe is a small punctuation mark ( ‘ ) placed after a noun to show that the noun owns something. The apostrophe will always be placed either before or after an s at the end of the noun owner. Always the noun owner will be followed (usually immediately) by the thing it owns.

How do you make the name Charles possessive?

So in summary: Traditionally, the possessive of Charles is Charles’s, pronounced “Charlz-uhz.” According to the new rules, the possessive of Charles is Charles’, which can be pronounced either “Charlz” or “Charlz-uhz.”

What is the correct possessive form of Jesus?

A: The form written with an apostrophe plus “s” (that is, “Jesus’s”) can represent either a contraction (short for “Jesus is” or “Jesus has”) or the possessive form of the name. But in the expression you’re writing, it would clearly be the possessive.

What are the 3 Uses of apostrophe?

Apostrophes have three main uses: 1. To indicate possession 2. To indicate an omission of letters or numbers 3. To separate the s from plural letters/numbers and abbreviations followed by periods.

Which is correct Chris’s or Chris?

Which is correct, Chris’s chair or Chris’ chair? James’s car or James’ car? Actually, both ways are correct. If a proper name ends with an s, you can add just the apostrophe or an apostrophe and an s.

How do you know when to use apostrophe S?

Apostrophe Rules for PossessivesUse an apostrophe + S (‘s) to show that one person/thing owns or is a member of something. … Use an apostrophe after the “s” at the end of a plural noun to show possession. … If a plural noun doesn’t end in “s,” add an apostrophe + “s” to create the possessive form.

Is it Davis’s or Davis?

According to Grammarbook.com, the nerds of the world will argue heatedly on the subject for eternity, but the most roundly accepted rule is to include the apostrophe, along with an extra “S.” (Davis’s rather than Davis’).

Is it the Smith’s house or the Smiths house?

Original: I walked over to the Smith’s house. Correct : I walked over to the Smiths’ house. The house is occupied by the Smiths, not the Smith, so the name must be treated as a plural possessive.

Is it Thomas or Thomas’s?

So a safe solution is to treat singular nouns ending in S the same way you treat singulars nouns not ending in S: Form the possessive with an apostrophe and an S. Thomas’s house. The important thing to remember is that Thomas is singular.

Do you ever use S’s?

One method, common in newspapers and magazines, is to add an apostrophe plus s (‘s) to common nouns ending in s, but only a stand-alone apostrophe to proper nouns ending in s. Another widely used technique, the one we favor, is to write the word as we would speak it.

How do you use possessive s?

The general rule is that the possessive of a singular noun is formed by adding an apostrophe and s, whether the singular noun ends in s or not. The possessive of a plural noun is formed by adding only an apostrophe when the noun ends in s, and by adding both an apostrophe and s when it ends in a letter other than s.

What are the 5 examples of apostrophe?

Apostrophe ExamplesTwinkle, twinkle, little star, how I wonder what you are. ( … O holy night! … Then come, sweet death, and rid me of this grief. ( … O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth. ( … Roll on, thou deep and dark blue Ocean – roll! ( … Welcome, O life!More items…•

How do you write the possessive form of a name ending in s?

Add -es for names ending in “s” or “z” and add -s for everything else. When indicating the possessive, if there is more than one owner add an apostrophe to the plural; if there is one owner, add ‘s to the singular (The Smiths’ car vs. Smith’s car).

Which is correct the Smiths or the Smith’s?

Unlike singular possessives, which take an apostrophe followed by an S, plural possessives take an apostrophe alone. So if you’re going to the home of the Smiths, you’re going to the Smiths’ house.

Is it Ross’s or Ross?

The possessive form of almost all proper names is formed by adding apostrophe and s to a singular or apostrophe alone to a plural. By this style rule, you would express the plural of Ross as Ross’s.

What is the possessive form of Harris?

In essence this is, “If it ends with a z sound, treat it like a plural; if it ends with an s sound, treat it like a singular.” Thus they would write “Dickens’, Hopkins’, Williams’,” but also “Harris’s, Thomas’s, Callas’s” and the like.

How do you pluralize proper names?

When a family name (a proper noun) is pluralized, we almost always simply add an “s.” So we go to visit the Smiths, the Kennedys, the Grays, etc. When a family name ends in s, x, ch, sh, or z, however, we form the plural by added -es, as in the Marches, the Joneses, the Maddoxes, the Bushes, the Rodriguezes.

Is Williams’s correct?

The Associated Press Stylebook recommends just an apostrophe: It’s Tennessee Williams’ best play. But most other authorities endorse ‘s: Williams’s. Williams’s means “belonging to Williams.” It is not the plural form of Williams.

What is correct Jones or Jones’s?

The Joneses is correct because it indicates more than one member of the family. The Jones’s indicates possession, as in the Jones’s home. Simply add an s to the end of your last name to indicate the message is coming from more than one family member. If your name ends in s or z, as in Jones or Juarez, add es.