What Is Possessive Pronoun And Examples?

Who are possessive pronouns?

Whose is a possessive pronoun.

Use it when you’re asking (or telling) whom something belongs to.

For example: whose sandwich is this?.

What are the 7 possessive pronouns?

The possessive pronouns are my, our, your, his, her, its, and their. There’s also an “independent” form of each of these pronouns: mine, ours, yours, his, hers, its, and theirs.

What type of pronoun is their?

Possessive personal pronouns are pronouns that show possession. They define a person (or a number of people) who owns a particular object. If you are learning English as a second language, remember that the possessive personal pronouns are mine, yours, hers, his, its, ours, and theirs.

What are personal and possessive pronouns?

The personal pronouns mine, yours, hers, his, ours, and theirs are known as possessive pronouns: they refer to something owned by the speaker or by someone or something previously mentioned.

What is the difference between genitive and possessive?

As adjectives the difference between possessive and genitive is that possessive is of or pertaining to ownership or possession while genitive is (grammar) of or pertaining to that case (as the second case of latin and greek nouns) which expresses origin or possession it corresponds to the possessive case in english.

Is someone’s possessive?

The possessive adjective for someone.

What is the difference between possessive adjective and possessive pronoun?

A Possessive Adjective specify ownership. It appears together with the Noun. It is always used before a Noun. A Possessive Pronoun also shows ownership.

How do you explain a possessive pronoun?

Possessive pronouns describe what things belong to which people, like “her shoe” or “the book is mine.” Possessive pronouns can be adjectives, like “his bicycle,” or they can stand in for nouns, like “the seats are theirs.” Neither of these forms should have apostrophes to show possession — so it’s ours (not our’s) …

What is a possessive example?

Examples of possessive in a Sentence Adjective If you marry him, he is only going to become even more jealous and possessive than he is now. The possessive form of “dog” is “dog’s.” “His” and “her” are possessive pronouns. Noun “Your” and “yours” are possessives. The possessive of “it” is “its.”

What is reciprocal pronoun with example?

We use reciprocal pronouns when each of two or more subjects is acting in the same way towards the other. For example, A is talking to B, and B is talking to A. So we say: A and B are talking to each other.

How do you use distributive pronouns?

Either and neither should be used only in speaking of two persons or things. When more than two persons or things are spoken of, any, no one or none should be used….Distributive pronounsEach boy was given a prize.Either road leads to the railway station.Neither accusation is true.

Which is or that is?

Let Us Explain The clause that comes after the word “which” or “that” is the determining factor in deciding which one to use. If the clause is absolutely pertinent to the meaning of the sentence, you use “that.” If you could drop the clause and leave the meaning of the sentence intact, use “which.”

What is a singular possessive?

Singular possessive nouns are easy. If a person, place or thing owns something all you have to do is add an ‘s. Here are some examples: Sandra’s dog is very cute. The boss’s car is orange.

What are the two types of possessive pronouns?

There are two types of possessive pronouns: The strong (or absolute) possessive pronouns are mine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, yours, and theirs. They refer back to a noun or noun phrase already used, replacing it to avoid repetition: “I said that phone was mine.”

What are the 12 possessive pronouns?

Possessive pronouns include my, mine, our, ours, its, his, her, hers, their, theirs, your and yours.

What is possessive case with example?

Using Apostrophes to Form Possessive NounsTypeExamplePossessive Casesingular noundogdog’s dinnerplural noundogsdogs’ dinnersingular noun ending -sChrisChris’ hat or Chris’s hatplural noun not ending -sPeoplePeople’s rights

How do you explain possessive pronouns to children?

Possessive pronouns are pronouns that show ownership. They include: my, mine, your, yours, his, her, hers, our, ours, their, and theirs. Unlike other possessives, you do not use an apostrophe.